Dr. Nathaniel Kinsey

VOYAGER at the Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Nathaniel Kinsey

VOYAGER at the Virginia Commonwealth University

“One area of focus for research in the College of Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University revolves around the development of metamaterials, integrated nanophotonics, and the accompanying scientific advances they enable. In many cases these technologies blend size scales (such as large-area arrays or long continuous structures), making them difficult to fabricate with any singular method. Using our previous combination SEM/EBL, we were limited to small, single write areas as a result of the poor positioning stage accuracy, which limited what was possible.

In this sense, the new Raith VOYAGER installed in the Wright Virginia Microelectronics Center at VCU is a true game-changer. With the traxx and periodixx features and radically improved stage control, we are now able to seamlessly blend nanometer to centimeter size scales, simultaneously achieving the precision needed for sub-10-nm gaps in plasmonic antennas while also writing photonic circuits that extend across an entire wafer.

The Raith VOYAGER provides VCU a true quantum leap in nanofabrication facilities that is impacting more than just photonics. Within the first month of installation, the tool has attracted researchers from a wide range of areas including bioelectronics, nano-magnetics, tissue engineering, and protein sensing. As these seemingly disparate fields coalesce around the VOYAGER, we look forward to seeing what exciting multi-disciplinary science emerges to improve the human condition in nano-systems and biotechnology.

Acquisition of the Raith VOYAGER System was made possible by the Virginia Higher Education Equipment Trust Fund, Virginia Commonwealth University Office of Research and Innovation, Virginia Commonwealth University College of Engineering, and the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.”

Image of the Raith VOYAGER electron beam lithography tool in the Wright Virginia Microelectronics Cleanroom in the College of Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University.